Skip to content

Your Basket (0)

View basket

Your basket is empty

Continue shopping
img
Tagua Slice Bib Necklace

Just like that, add drama to your outfit with the Tagua Slice Bib Necklace. Style with a simple white tee and jeans and you're ready to go from day to night just by slipping into your favorite shoes. Tagua is a seed from a fast-growing palm tree, a sustainable alternative to plastic that's light, can be neutral or bright and always eco-friendly. Handmade by makers with our artisan partner, Camari, working to ensure they receive stable, fair income that enable them to carry on family traditions of working the land and preserving indigenous culture through traditional crafts.

HANDCRAFTED IN ECUADOR

  • Tagua, a seed from a palm tree. A natural alternative to plastic.
  • Adjustable length on double leather cord.
  • Adjustable knot closure.
  • Necklace is 32" at the longest adjustable length, with beads sitting between two knots staying in place at a length of 9.5".
  • Pieces alternate in muted purple and mustard approximately 1"L x .4"W in size.
  • Handcrafted in Ecuador

SKU: 8404080

THE MAKERS

Camari is an income generating program that works to enable small farmers, or "campesinos," to remain in their home communities instead of leaving to find scarce work in the cities. Camari works to confront the problem of marketing agricultural and handicraft products on behalf of several hundred peasant groups. Camari unites people, works to ensure they receive stable, fair income and enables them to carry on family traditions of working the land, as well as preserving indigenous culture through the creation of traditional crafts. Ten Thousand Villages has purchased products from Camari since 1990.
img
img

Welcome to our global maker-to-market movement where, together with 20,000 artisans, we ignite social change. We create opportunities for individuals, families, and communities in developing countries to thrive through strong relationships, fair wages, safe working conditions, and sustainable practices.

Tenthousandvillages.com